Training course for Itrax advanced users

In June 20-22 2017 the Itrax Advanced Operators training takes place in a beatiful Stockholm. The invitation for this training event is open for all users. These days give the user an overview of x-ray spectroscopy and of the advanced tools available in the Itrax Qspec software for x-ray spectra evaluation and determination of concentrations of all detected chemical elements, as well as the RediCore software for data compilation and display. This training puts the Itrax user in control of the analytical aspects, as well as phenomena like x-ray diffraction. Until now, dozens of Itrax users have enjoyed this yearly event and the deepened XRF knowledge it brings.

More than 600 refereed articles with Itrax data published until 2016

The total number of articles that contain Itrax data has now passed the 600 level with an impressive 139 refereed articles published during 2016, and the number is increasing each year, as you can see from the diagram below. The growth is a strong proof of Itrax importance in sediment related research, and Itrax Corescanner is without comparison the most widely used XRF scanner. The number of articles with Itrax Corescanner data makes up the largest part of these articles, with 128 articles during 2016. You can download a complete list with references to all articles, by clicking the link on the Download page.

Itrax-articles-2016

Australian Itrax laboratory scans one kilometer of sediment cores

The Itrax Corescanner at ANSTO (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation) was installed in 2012 and has now passed a total of one kilometre of scanned sediment cores. The milestone is a reflection of the instrument’s unique capability to reconstruct past climate and environments. The information obtained from the core scanner in combination with other techniques provides a multi-proxy approach to solving environmental puzzles. ANSTO and external researchers have utilised the ITRAX to image and identify elements in sediment cores, wood, coral, speleothems, feathers, clams, and whale baleen samples to answer important environmental questions.- See more by clicking this link to ANSTOs newspage: http://www.ansto.gov.au/AboutANSTO/MediaCentre/News/ACS090153#sthash.vMhhNIDx.dpuf

 

XRF scanning conference 2017

This meeting is held in Taipei in 20th – 22nd of March 2017.

If you are interested in XRF core scanning, please feel very welcome to sign up for this gathering!

An excerpt from the meeting homepage: “XRF scanners have made an important contribution to the non-destructive and high resolution investigation of sediment cores from lakes and and marine environments over the last 25 years.  More recently, they also contribute to the investigation of rock cores for minerals and other resources. It is considered timely to bring together international specialists using high resolution analytical sediment core scanners areas to present new research, to stimulate new collaborations and discussions and to propose new technological developments.”

Here’s the link: http://b00302249.wixsite.com/mxcs

Itrax officer voted “On the job” winner in Australian competition

The Australian Academy of Science announced today that ITRAX Facility Officer Patricia Gadd is the national winner of the ‘On the Job’ competition.  Patricia was one of seven finalists chosen from across Australia, who keep Australian science moving.

Click this link to see Patricia’s video
Matt Bell from the Australian Centre for Neutron Scattering was also a finalist and featured in a short video produced by Australia’s science channel and sharing during National Science Week.

Patricia was the people’s choice for the award as it followed a public vote during National Science Week. The competition recognised Australia’s laboratory and field technicians, support staff and machine operators who keep Australian science moving ahead.

Working in environmental science, she helped establish Australia’s first micro X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) scanning facility. Patricia assists academics, researchers and PhD students in a variety of projects that analyses and images samples using the ITRAX instrument. ITRAX can be used to study sediments and rock cores, speleothems, corals and wood to reconstruct past climates and environments. Patricia is passionate about her contribution to environmental science and has been a collaborative part of more than 25 publications.

As part of the prize, Patricia will have the opportunity to spend a day with a world-renowned researcher.

– See more at: http://www.ansto.gov.au/AboutANSTO/MediaCentre/News/ACS103797#sthash.5b5uc8Eo.dpuf

The number of scientific articles containing data produced with the Itrax instruments grows for every year

The number of articles that contain Itrax data has now passed the 100 level with an impressive 128 refereed articles published during 2015, and over 500 articles since the start in 2005. The first article appeared in 2005, and the number has been steadily growing, as you can see from the diagram below. The growth shows how the importance of XRF core scanning has been growing during these eleven years. The number of articles with Itrax Corescanner data makes up the largest part of these articles, with 104 articles during 2015. You can download a complete list with references to all articles, by clicking the link on the Download page.

Itrax-articles-diagram

This diagram shows the number of articles containing Itrax data, per year since 2005 when the first article appeared.

Biochemical markers in archaeological shipwrecks; determination of Sulphur and Iron in wood with Itrax Multiscanner

A group of Swedish researchers have presented an article in Nature, where they map the accumulation of inorganic elements in archaeological wood from the Swedish warship Vasa and from the English Mary Rose. Sulphur has accumulated in the wood through biogeochemical processes and together with Iron, it constitutes a threat to the drying wood when combined with oxygen. Sulphuric acid is formed in big quantities and constitute a long term threat to these important parts of the cultural heritage. The XRF analyses for Sulphur, Iron and other chemical elements in the ships wood were performed with Itrax Multiscanner.

Below is a link for access to the whole article:

http://www.nature.com/articles/srep04222